stove was too dear and that it would cost too much hydro to run it. All the while, however, she was polishing its already shiny chrome knobs. In spite of her objections, Dad and I knew that she cherished that new stove. There were many other modern things that old farm needed, like indoor plumbing and a clothes dryer, but Mom insisted that those things would have to wait until we could afford them. Mom was forever doing chores - washing laundry by hand, tending the pigs, or working in our huge garden - so she always wore mended, cotton-print housedresses and an apron to protect the front. She did have one or two "special" dresses saved for Church on Sundays. And amongst everything else She did, she still managed to make almost all of our clothes. They weren't fancy, but they did wear well. That Christmas I bought Dad a handful of fishing lures from the Five to a Dollar store, wrapped them individually in matchboxes so he'd have plenty of gifts to open from me. Choosing something for Mother was much harder. When Dad and I asked, she thought carefully then hinted modestly for some tea towels, face clothes or a new dishpan. On our last trip to town before Christmas, we were driving up Main Street when mother suddenly exclaimed in surprise: "Would you just look at that!" She pointed excitedly as Dad drove past Eaton's. "That big red dress is gone," she said in disbelief. "It's actually gone." "Well...I'll be!" Dad chuckled. "By golly, it is!" "Who'd be fool enough to buy such a frivolous dress?" Mother questioned, shaking her head. I quickly stole a glance at Dad. His blue eyes were twinkling as he nudged me with his elbow. Mother craned her neck for another glimpse out the rear window as we rode on up the street. "It's gone..." she whispered. I was almost certain that I detected a trace of yearning
心 灵 鸡 汤 第 10 页
in her voice. I'll never forget that Christmas morning. I watched as Mother peeled the tissue paper off a large box that read, "Eaton's Finest Enamel Dishpan" on its lid. "Oh Frank," she praised, "just what I wanted!" Dad was sitting in his rocker, a huge grin on his face. "Only a fool wouldn't give a priceless wife like mine exactly what she wants for Christmas," he laughed. "Go ahead, open it up and make sure there are no chips." Dad winked at me, confirming his secret, and my heart filled with more love for my father than I thought it could hold! Mother opened the box to find a big white enamel dishpan - overflowing with crimson satin that spilled out across her lap. With trembling hands she touched the elegant material of Big Red. "Oh my goodness!" she managed to utter, her eyes filled with tears. "Oh Frank..." Her face was as bright as the star that twinkled on our tree in the corner of the small room. "You shouldn't have..." came her faint attempt at scolding. "Oh now, never mind that!" Dad said. "Let's see if it fits," he laughed, helping her slip the marvelous dress over her shoulders. As the shimmering red satin fell around her, it gracefully hid the patched and faded floral housedress underneath. I watched, my mouth agape, captivated by a radiance in my parents I had never noticed before. As they waltzed around the room, Big Red swirled its magic deep into my heart. "You look beautiful," my dad whispered to my mom - and she surely did!
River Baptism
By Garth Gilchrist The summer I turned thirteen, my family's summer vacation was a visit to our relatives in the mountains of North Carolina. My cousin Jim, who was my age, took me down to his favorite swimming hole along the river. It was a deep pool under a high canopy of leaves. From the top of a twenty-five-foot cliff we looked down into the shimmering water and across to a sandy beach. Standing beside us on the edge of that cliff grew a big white oak tree, with its roots sunk deep down into the rock. And hanging from a limb that stretched out at just the right height and angle, was a rope swing. "Look here," said Jim. "This is the way you do it. You got to get a running start. Then you grab the rope and swing out and up as high as you can, and then you let go and fall to the water. Here, I'll show you." Jim made it look easy, and when his head surfaced in the bubbling water he hollered up, "Now it's your turn!" I was certain I was going to die, but at thirteen dying is better than looking bad. When I came up sputtering, Jim smiled approvingly and we swam a few strokes to the beach, lay on the hot sand for awhile, and then swam back across the pool to do it again.





11

Jim and all of his friends always wore the proper North Carolina swimming attire, for skinny-dipping was a time honored tradition among boys throughout the mountain states. Sometimes I felt like I was a wild boy, or a beaver sliding through the water. Jim said he felt like an otter, since he loved to turn and twist in the deep pools and could swim under water a long ways. Jim's family was Baptists. On Sunday, Jim's mom made us dress up in straight-jacket white shirts and strangle-hold ties, marched us down the street and filed us into church. "You must be baptized, by water and by the Spirit" the preacher thundered. That water baptism sounded mighty good. I sat there dreaming of the river and waiting for the wonderful moment when the sermon would be over and Jim and I could go running down the path to the river. On the tails of the closing prayer, Jim and I flew out into the sunny day and home for a quick sandwich. Then we plunged down the trail into the woods alive with the hum of cicadas hanging thick in the branches of the burr oaks and hickories. When we got within a hundred yards of the rope swing, Jim said, "I'll race you!" "You got it!" I replied. We dropped our clothes right there and tore down the trail to see who could get to the rope swing first. I was a fast runner, but Jim was faster. He pulled ahead of me and dove for the rope. With a shriek of victory, Jim swung out over the water and up, to the very top of the arc. In perfect form, Jim let go of the rope and looked down to see where he was going to land. But there - not twenty yards away on the beach - stood the preacher and two dozen of the faithful, performing a baptism. I could see they were looking straight up at Jim with their mouths wide open. As fervently as Jim prayed to fly, he quickly descended from the heavens. Jim abandoned his plans for a graceful swan dive and instinctively assumed the cannonball position - known for its magnificent splash. The whole congregation got baptized that day. But Jim never saw it. He broke his record for underwater swimming and was around the bend and out of sight while the congregation stood stunned and speechless on the shore. "Don't worry, Jim," I consoled him later. "I'm sure everybody thought you were an angel, and besides, it turned out fine. You got the river dunking you wanted, and those folks will never forget that baptism." Thinking about it now, I don't think there's much difference, anyway, between wild boys and angels, or between heaven and a rope swing on the river.
The Greatest of These
By Nanette Thorsen-Snipes My day began on a decidedly sour note when I saw my six-year-old wrestling with a limb of my azalea bush. By the time I got outside, he'd broken it. "Can I take this to school today?" he asked. With a wave of my hand, I sent him off. I turned my back so he wouldn't see the tears gathering in my eyes. I loved that azalea bush. I touched the broken limb as if to say silently, "I'm sorry." I wished I could have said that to my husband earlier, but I'd been angry. The washing machine had leaked on my brand-new linoleum. If he'd just taken the time to fix it the night before when I asked him instead of playing checkers with Jonathan. What are his priorities anyway? I wondered. I was still mopping up the mess when Jonathan walked into the kitchen. "What's for breakfast, Mom?" I opened the empty refrigerator. "Not cereal," I said, watching the sides of his mouth drop. "How about toast and jelly?" I smeared the toast with jelly and set it in front of him. Why was I so angry? I tossed my husband's dishes into the sudsy water. It was days like this that made me want to quit. I just wanted to drive up to the mountains, hide in a cave, and never come out.
心 灵 鸡 汤 第 12 页
Somehow I managed to lug the wet clothes to the laundromat. I spent most of the day washing and drying clothes and thinking how love had disappeared from my life. Staring at the graffiti on the walls, I felt as wrung-out as the clothes left in the washers. As I finished hanging up the last of my husband's shirts, I looked at the clock. 2:
  30. I was late. Jonathan's class let out at 2:
  15. I dumped the clothes in the back seat and hurriedly drove to the school. I was out of breath by the time I knocked on the teacher's door and peered through the glass. With one finger, she motioned for me to wait. She said something to Jonathan and handed him and two other children crayons and a sheet of paper. What now? I thought, as she rustled through the door and took me aside. "I want to talk to you about Jonathan," she said. I prepared myself for the worst. Nothing would have surprised me. "Did you know Jonathan brought flowers to school today?" she asked. I nodded, thinking about my favorite bush and trying to hide the hurt in my eyes. I glanced at my son busily coloring a picture. His wavy hair was too long and flopped just beneath his brow. He brushed it away with the back of his hand. His eyes burst with blue as he admired his handiwork. "Let me tell you about yesterday," the teacher insisted. "See that little girl?" I watched the bright-eyed child laugh and point to a colorful picture taped to the wall. I nodded. "Well, yesterday she was almost hysterical. Her mother and father are going through a nasty divorce. She told me she didn't want to live, she wished she could die. I watched that little girl bury her face in her hands and say loud enough for the class to hear, 'Nobody loves me.' I did all I could to console her, but it only seemed to make matters worse." "I thought you wanted to talk to me about Jonathan," I said. "I do," she said, touching the sleeve of my blouse. "Today your son walked straight over to that child. I watched him hand her some pretty pink flowers and whisper, 'I love you.'" I felt my heart swell with pride for what my son had done. I smiled at the teacher. "Thank you," I said, reaching for Jonathan's hand, "you've made my day." Later that evening, I began pulling weeds from around my lopsided azalea bush. As my mind wandered back to the love Jonathan showed the little girl, a biblical verse came to me: "...these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love." While my son had put love into practice, I had only felt anger. I heard the familiar squeak of my husband's brakes as he pulled into the drive. I snapped a small limb bristling with hot pink azaleas off the bush. I felt the seed of love that God planted in my family beginning to bloom once again in me. My husband's eyes widened in surprise as I handed him the flowers. "I love you," I said.
The Marks of Life
By Diana Golden My teammates on the United States Disabled Ski Team used to tease me about the size of my chest, joking that my greatest handicap wasn't my missing leg but my missing cleavage. Little did they know how true that would become. This past year, I found out that for the second time in my life I had cancer, this time in both breasts. I had bilateral mastectomies. When I heard I'd need the surgery, I didn't think it would be a big deal. I even told my friends playfully, "I'll keep you abreast of the situation." After all, I had lost my leg to my first go-round with cancer at age 12, then gone on to become a world-champion ski racer. All of us on the Disabled Ski Team were missing one set of body parts or another. I saw that a man in a wheelchair can be utterly sexy. That a woman who has no hands can appear not to be
心 灵 鸡 汤 第 13 页
missing anything. That wholeness has nothing to do with missing parts and everything to do with spirit. Yet although I knew this, I was surprised to discover how difficult it was to adjust to my new scars. When they brought me back to consciousness after the surgery, I started to sob and hyperventilate. Suddenly I found that I didn't want to face the loss of more of my body. I didn't want chemotherapy again. I didn't want to be brave and tough and put on a perpetual smiling face. I didn't ever want to wake up again. My breathing grew so shaky that the anesthesiologist gave me oxygen and then, thankfully, put me back to sleep.
When I was doing hill sprints to prepare for my ski racing - my heart and lungs and leg muscles all on fire - I'd often be hit by the sensation that there were no resources left inside me with which to keep going. Then I'd think about the races ahead - my dream of pushing my potential as far as it could go, the satisfaction of breaking through my own barriers - and that would get me through the sprints. The same tenacity that served me so well in ski racing helped me survive my second bout with cancer. After the mastectomies, I knew that one way to get myself going would be to start exercising again, so I headed for the local pool. In the communal shower, I found myself noticing other women's breasts for the first time in my life. Size-D breasts and size-A breasts, sagging breasts and perky brea
  •  
 

相关内容

心灵鸡汤(英语美文 精致插图)

   CONTENTS ................................................................ ........................................ Be Still With God ........................................................................ 11 ....................................... ...

英语美文

   1。如果只是遇见,不能停留,不如不遇见。 If we can only encounter each other rather than stay with each other,then I wish we had never encountered. 2。宁愿笑着流泪,也不哭着说后悔。心碎了,还需再补吗? I would like weeping with the smile rather than repenting with the cry,when my heart is brok ...

英语美文

   1.Western Civilization Faces a Stark Choice Ⅰ In 1900, most westerners were confident and optimistic, full of pride about their civilization. Since then, the west has made enormous strides in economic, scientific, military, political and social ter ...

英语美文

   a forever friend 永远的朋友 a friend walk in when the rest of the world walks out. 别人都走开的时候,朋友仍与你在一起。” sometimes in life, 有时候在生活中, you find a special friend; 你会找到一个特别的朋友; someone who changes your life just by being part of it. 他只是你生活中的一部分内容,却能改变你整个的生活。 ...

英语美文

       做到最好 They say "Make the best of a bad situation". But I believe the bad situation makes the best of you. Even the irritations1 of life can be useful. President Abraham Lincoln showed us how this is so.   One of his cabinet ...

英语美文

   1.The most effective means to solve this problem is that . In that case, . 2. Everything has its own two sides, no exception with AAA. For one thing, . for another, . 3. My experience tells me that to needs a thorough and persevering process, and i ...

英语美文

   www.topsage.com Every Moment Is Special 在我们的生活中,每一刻都在发生着巨大的改变。每一天、每一小时、每一分钟 都是那么特别,享受这每一刻的特别,不要延迟任何可以给你的生活带来欢笑与 快乐的事情。 All that is beautiful poems and passages of life things do not change;we chang 大家学习 e.sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. 网 ...

英语美文

   www.topsage.com Every Moment Is Special 在我们的生活中,每一刻都在发生着巨大的改变.每一天,每一小时,每一分钟 都是那么特别,享受这每一刻的特别,不要延迟任何可以给你的生活带来欢笑与 快乐的事情. All that is beautiful poems and passages of life things do not change;we chang 大家学习 e.sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. 网 ...

英语美文

   每日一推荐: 每日一推荐:英语之妙语连珠 94 句 http://www.sina.com.cn 2009 年 01 月 07 日 11:38 新浪教育 本文选自《海纳百川》的博客,点击查看博客原文 本文选自《海纳百川》的博客,点击查看博客原文 1. It's not like that.不是那样的。 这句话是用来辟谣的。 当别人误会了一件事的来龙去脉, 你就可以跟他说 It's not like that.“不是那样的。”当然随着语气及情境的不同,It's not like that.这句 ...

英语美文

   经典感恩节英文短信 IT WILL BE SAD NOT TO SEE YOU DURING THE HOLIDAY WHEN FAMILIES GET TOGETHER. 家人团聚的节日里,不能看到你,我会感到难过。 THIS IS TO OUR FIRST THANKSGIVING TOGETHER. 致我们第一次的感恩节相聚。 OUR FIRST THANKSGIVING SHOULD BE OUR BEST. 我们第一次共度的感恩节,是我们最美好的时光。 IT MAY NOT SEE ...

热门内容

大学英语六级备考

   大学英语六级备考 各个击破法 复习最有效 还有 60 多天就考试了,要如何复习呢?王老师建议:各个题型分开复习效果最明显,尤其 是新增题型要足够重视.这大致包括听力长对话,快速阅读,仔细阅读,翻译四部分.王老 师表示,新六级考试,加大了主观性试题的测试,偏重听说读写实际应用能力的考查. 根据目前新东方在线举办的英语六级专项模拟考试结果分析, 长对话和翻译是考生的薄弱环 节,丢分最多,平均得分不到一半.王老师认为,如果考生在长对话,翻译,写作等题型上 不加强练习,很可能在考试中栽跟头. 1.坚 ...

聊天英语 首字母查询

   eHarmony 2 = to/too 2B or not 2B = To be or not to be 4 = for 4ever = forever A: ASL = Age/Sex/Location AFAIC = As Far As I’m Concerned AFAIK = As Far As I Know AFK = Away From Keyboard AIAMU = And I’m A Monkey’s Uncle AISI = As I See It AKA = Also ...

2009年广东省深圳市?英语

   www.zk5u.com 中考资源网 -1- 中考资源网期待您的投稿!zkzyw@163.com www.zk5u.com 中考资源网 -2- 中考资源网期待您的投稿!zkzyw@163.com www.zk5u.com 中考资源网 -3- 中考资源网期待您的投稿!zkzyw@163.com www.zk5u.com 中考资源网 -4- 中考资源网期待您的投稿!zkzyw@163.com www.zk5u.com 中考资源网 -5- 中考资源网期待您的投稿!zkzyw@163.com www ...

小学英语对话教学初探

   小学英语对话教学初探 ??有效开展对话教学,提高小学生英语语言交际能力 ??有效开展对话教学, 有效开展对话教学 【摘要】《小学英语课程标准》明确指出,小学英语教学主要目的是使 摘要】 学生获得初步运用英语进行交际的能力。 而小学英语对话教学课堂是培养学生语 言交际能力的重要阵地,本文着重论述如何在小学英语教学中,抓好“五个环节” 有效开展对话教学,提高学生的英语语言交际能力。 【关键词】有效开展 对话教学 提高 英语语言交际能力 关键词】 巴西教育家保罗?弗莱雷,在其著名的论著《被压迫者教 ...

扬州2010中考英语

   仅供参考 1 c 2 c 3 d 4 b 5 b 6 c 7 d 8 b 9 b 10 b 11 a 12 c 13 d 14 b 15 c 16-20 a c b a c 21-25b d d d a 26-30 a d c b a 31-33 a d d 34-37 c d b a 38-41 d a b c 42-45 d b a b 46.go for a walk along with 47.across 48. invented 49. anywhere 50.dictionar ...